silver plated jewellery box
silver plated jewellery box
 
silver plated jewellery box
 
silver plated jewellery box
 

10. Silver Plated Jewellery Box


'C. 1900'

A very attractive antique late Victorian silver plated repousse jewellery box box in a shaped oval form and featuring a gorgeous chased romantic design showing figures and animals in an idyllic outdoor country scene. Secure closing top with a deep red velvet lining. A solid and quite heavy box. Electroplated silver, circa. 1900.

Jewellery boxes, jewellery caskets and trinket boxes have all varied widely in their appearance over history. Ornate styles with elaborate detail were initially common, indicating outwardly the value of the items inside. At the turn of the 20th century, novelty jewellery boxes enjoyed popularity. This was due to the Victorian's interest in filling their homes with decorative items of interest and intrigue, rather than simply owning that which was practical.


Condition: Fine. No damage. Original rich red velvet lining.

Dimensions: 12.5cm x 9.5cm.

Provenance: Ex. Property of a Cumbria estate, UK.

£55.00

Jewellery Boxes

Jewellery boxes were originally similar to treasure chests, hence the term 'jewellery casket' being interchangeable with 'jewellery box'. The term jewellery casket is usually used when referring to a larger box, which would be considered slightly smaller than a chest, and usually raised on feet, rather than the base being flat to the surface which it rests on.

Jewellery boxes were in common use as early as 5000 BC in Ancient Egypt as the majority of Egyptians, male and female, wore jewellery. The Egyptians preferred material was gold, often encrusted with precious gems and as such, a secure, yet often well decorated box or casket was required to keep such items safe. In Rome, jewellery was a status symbol, with only certain ranks permitted to wear rings for example. Fine brooches were used to secure items of clothing, and again, jewellery boxes were required for storage purpose.

Until the Victorian era, owning jewellery was a rare luxury, and to have enough jewellery to need storage for it was a privilege bestowed upon only a few members of royalty and high society. Fine jewellery became more affordable to the mass market after the industrial revolution, due to the reduction in cost once machine cutting of stones and metal was possible. Jewellery boxes and caskets therefore became smaller, due to the necessity for more middle class families to have in their homes, while only containing very few pieces of jewellery. Trinket boxes were also common in Victorian households full of collectables and pieces of interest. These were much smaller than traditional jewellery boxes, accommodating smaller items such as rings- and much fewer of them than is typical today.

Jewellery boxes, jewellery caskets and trinket boxes have all varied widely in their appearance over history. Ornate styles with elaborate detail were initially common, indicating outwardly the value of the items inside. At the turn of the 20th century, novelty jewellery boxes enjoyed popularity. This was due to the Victorian's interest in filling their homes with decorative items of interest and intrigue, rather than simply owning that which was practical and absolutely necessary for daily life. Novelty boxes were created to look as though they are a statue or are in the form of something else- such as an Edwardian jewellery box created in the form of a miniature 18th century card table.

The variety of styles and sizes of antique silver jewellery boxes mean that any taste can be catered to- everything from minimal clean lines or ornate floral decoration are available on our site, depending on the personal taste of the owner and their home decor. Antique and vintage jewellery boxes are timeless gifts that take pride of place in any home, and that are appreciated by all jewellery lovers and collectors.


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