japanese lacquer stand
japanese lacquer stand
 
japanese lacquer stand
 
japanese lacquer stand
 
japanese lacquer stand
 
japanese lacquer stand
 

5. Japanese lacquer stand


'Meiji Period'

A Japanese lacquer stand, Meiji period, of lobed oblong form, the apron decorated with gilt waves on a black ground.

The Meiji era brought Japanese art to the international stage for the first time. The participation of Japanese artists in European exhibitions, and the establishment in 1907 of the official Bunten exhibition in Tokyo - which sought to replicate the French Salon (the official exhibition of the French Academy of Fine Arts) - introduced Japanese audiences to a wide range of artistic styles.


Condition: Some wear to raised areas of table top, rim, feet and underside.

Dimensions: 26cm (W) 17cm (H)

Provenance: Ex. private collection, Hampshire, UK.

£100.00

Meiji-Period Art

In 1868 the restoration of imperial rule in Japan brought the Edo shogunate to an end, and marked the start of the Meiji era, which would last until the death of Emperor Meiji in 1912. During this brief period the country experienced radical social and political shifts, and a host of reforms which propelled Japan - closed to international trade for more than 200 years - from feudalism into modernity. The profound impact of the country's new engagement with foreign cultures is evident in many areas of Meiji-period art, which reflected a new era for the nation and its developing relationship with the wider world.

The Meiji era brought Japanese art to the international stage for the first time. The participation of Japanese artists in European exhibitions, and the establishment in 1907 of the official Bunten exhibition in Tokyo - which sought to replicate the French Salon (the official exhibition of the French Academy of Fine Arts) - introduced Japanese audiences to a wide range of artistic styles.

The Meiji period saw a rapid expansion of artistic forms, mediums, subjects and styles, a stark contrast to the relatively limited production - mainly swords and armour - commissioned by samurai patrons in the Edo period.

In the medium of painting, the Meiji government promoted the yoga - or Western - style, sending Japanese students to study abroad and opening the door for European artists to come to Japan to share their knowledge and technical skills. In turn this eventually gave rise to a revival of nihonga painting, which stressed a return to traditional Japanese mediums, themes and techniques. Still, even nihonga reflected the influence of European aesthetic conventions, underlining the depth of cross-cultural links in this period. Ultimately, much of Meiji art was marked by a blending of cultures, and an innovative interchange of old and new.


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