corgi toys chitty chitty bang bang with figures
corgi toys chitty chitty bang bang with figures
 
corgi toys chitty chitty bang bang with figures
 
corgi toys chitty chitty bang bang with figures
 
corgi toys chitty chitty bang bang with figures
 

1. Chitty Chitty Bang Bang with Figures and Working Wings


'No. 266 - Near Mint Condition'

This wonderful vintage model car is a 1968 Corgi Toys Chitty Chitty Bang Bang Model 266, and dates to the release of the musical of the same name. The musical is based on Ian Fleming's novel Chitty Chitty Bang Bang: The Magical Car (published in 1964). No.266 Chitty Chitty Bang Bang is complete with four figures based on the main characters from the film; Caractacus Potts, Truly Scrumptious, Jeremy & Jemima Potts. The car's wings are released via the handbrake next to Caractacus. The wings are folded back manually to close, ensuring that the handbrake is in the correct position to prevent them springing out again. This classic Corgi Toys Chitty Chitty Bang Bang car with all figures in original and near mint, unboxed condition. All original parts and working extendable wings. And as you can see from the photos, it really can fly!

Some of the best known and most popular Corgi models were of cars made famous in film and television such as the Batmobile, Chitty Chitty Bang Bang and James Bond's Aston Martin DB5. November 1968 saw the release of the flying car Chitty Chitty Bang Bang'(266) from the successful film of the same name that had been in cinemas throughout that summer, and which featured plastic wings that popped out from the car's side skirts when the hand brake was pushed and detailed miniatures of the car's inventor Caractacus Potts, Truly Scrumptious and the children Jeremy and Jemima.


Condition: Near Mint. A few tiny moisture marks on bonnet below windshield and side footrest (see photos).

Dimensions: 15.5 x 11.2 (including wings) x 5.4cm.

Provenance: Ex. collection Hampshire, UK.

£75.00

Corgi Toys

Corgi Toys (trademark) is the name of a range of die-cast toy vehicles produced by Mettoy Playcraft Ltd. in the United Kingdom. The Mettoy (Metal Toy) company was founded in 1933 by German émigré Philip Ullmann in Northampton, England, where he was later joined by South African-born German Arthur Katz, who had previously worked for Ullmann at his toy company Tipp and Co of Nuremberg. After dabbling for some years in the model car market, they decided to produce a range of diecast toy vehicles as competition to Meccano's Dinky Toys model vehicles, which had dominated the British market for many years. Corgi Toys were introduced in the UK in July 1956 and were manufactured in Swansea, Wales, for 27 years before the company went into liquidation. A management buy-out re-formed the company as Corgi Toys Limited in March 1984. In 1989, the management sold the Corgi brand to Mattel and the factory was retained under the name of Microlink Industries Ltd. In 1995, Corgi regained its independence as a new company, Corgi Classics Limited, and moved to new premises in Leicester.

The range was exported worldwide and sold in large numbers. Some of the best known and most popular models were of cars made famous in film and television such as the Batmobile, Chitty Chitty Bang Bang and James Bond's Aston Martin DB5 – which remains the largest selling toy car ever produced. Although the largest single vehicle type featured in the Corgi Toys range were models of cars from manufacturers around the world, this article sub-divides vehicles into genres, wherever possible, to allow a more detailed look at the variety of models produced by the company.

Corgi Toys introduced the first of the many film and television tie-in models that made the company famous in March 1965, with The Saint's Volvo P1800 (258) from the British television series The Saint starring Roger Moore. This was an update of the existing Volvo P1800 model that had been issued in 1962, now finished in white and featuring The Saint's logo on the bonnet and a model of The Saint in the drivers seat. The Corgi executives were impressed by how The Saint version sold in much larger numbers than the regular version, despite the fact that on the TV there was no Saint's logo on the car. With the second in the range of film and TV related models Corgi revolutionised the British toy car industry.

The most famous and best selling (to date) toy car of all, James Bond's Aston Martin DB5 (261) from the film Goldfinger, was issued in October 1965. Despite the fact that the casting of the new James Bond car was based heavily on the earlier Aston Martin DB4 model from 1960, it was the special features marked out this model. There were machine guns in the front wings which popped out at the touch of a button, a bulletproof shield which popped up to protect the rear screen when the exhaust pipes were pressed, and an ejector seat which fired through a roof panel which opened by the touch of another button. The model was released in time for the 1965 Christmas market and the Corgi factory found it was unable to keep up with demand, leading to coverage in the British press of stories of toy shop shelves being cleared of this new must-have toy in minutes. The model remains in production to this day in an updated form and has gone on to sell more than seven million examples in all its various versions.

November 1968 saw the release of the flying car Chitty Chitty Bang Bang'(266) from the successful film of the same name that had been in cinemas throughout that summer, and which featured plastic wings that popped out from the car's side skirts when the hand brake was pushed and detailed miniatures of the car's inventor Caractacus Potts, Truly Scrumptious and the children Jeremy and Jemima.


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